These are the courses I was involved in teaching at Rutgers University:

Teaching

In this page I will put the educational notes and videos related to the courses I am teaching or taught. I was going to make videos for my classes and post them here, but I don't think I can keep up with that these days. At least you can find some quizzes and problem sets for now.

I friendly suggest you, the science professors, that if you are using a locked system for managing the course, for any reason, please consider to make the files prepared for the course available to the public. You can use CC licenses. I use CC BY-SA for educational works. Here's why.


Physics 276 Spring 2017

This is a lab course. The sections that I will be guiding will meet 8:40-11:40am on Mondays and 6:40-9:30pm on Wednesdays. We will meet at room 106 in Serin building. I will have office hours Mondays 11:40am-12:40pm at the same lab room, i.e. room 106. If you couldn't find me there come to my office at Serin 289. You can also email me and meet me at my office Serin 289, but before doing so, consider to use other instructors' office hours. Read the 'Course Policy' on the home page of your Sakai. Also read below.

Developing 276: This is the first time we are testing this course with the notebooks prepared. I am sure Monday students are well aware. For example, Lab 1 had a PartII.Step3 which first we made it optional, and then removed it altogether.
Remember that the class activity, showing up in office hours, helping your fellow students, being on time with pre-lab and lab submissions, and helping us to refine the labs, all will count towards your final grade.

No Lab 275 Background: If you haven't taken Physics 275 course, you will have a bit of difficulty to catch up for the first week or two. To catch up you need to focus on two things, first, some simple Mathematica functionalities and coding in general, and second, and much more importantly, the error analysis. Do not miss the office hours to get guidance. You can go to other instructors' office hours. Do the error analysis readings which I will copy below (from last semester).

Error Analysis: The error analysis will be useful in almost all the labs in this course, and will be substantial part of your grade. Plus the error analysis will be an important part of any computational or experimental science you do later in life. Finish all the readings suggested below,
Books:
- P. R. Bevington, "Data Reduction and Error Analysis for the Physical Sciences", McGrawHill. Chapter 1 and 2.3,
- John R. Taylor, "An Introduction to Data analysis", University Science Books. Chapters 1 to 5.
You can find a copy of the above chapters inside your Sakai, Resources/Books folder.
It is also recommended to read this tutorial.
Doing this reading, you will save lots of time and hassle later on, when calculating or understanding errors.

Lab Prerequisites: You need to submit the lab's prerequisite (aka pre-lab) correctly before the lab. You can not start participating in the lab before handing in a correctly done pre-lab. So I strongly advise you to submit the lab's prerequisite few days before the lab, so I can send you comments and you can correct them on time.
If you do not have access to Mathematica, the lab prerequisites can be printed (pdf file) and done by hand. You can email me a photo or a scanned version.
Avoid doing the pre-lab during the lab session. If we see that you have to finish pre-lab after the lab, you will lose 1.0/10 point in the corresponding lab. If needed, you can do prerequisites during office hours.

Labs: I encourage you to finish the labs and submit during the session. Try to get the notebook or pdf files for the labs and go through them before the labs. I will put pdf files for reading, in case you do not have access to Mathematica to open the nb files.
Labs are due to about four days from the day you take the data (day of the lab). I have chosen Friday 6pm and Sunday 11pm as the deadlines for H1 and H8 sections, respectively. If you submit later, for each two more days passed, you will lose 5% of the total credit for that lab.
Missing two labs or more means failing the course. Missing one lab will also lower your final grade substantially.
If you cannot make it to our session, try to make up the lab in any other session during the same week. Send me and the other TA an email for the heads-up.

Grading: When checking your grades, go through the comments I gave you. The best way to do this is to open the new notebook file I sent you. All the comments are written in magenta color for visibility.

Notebooks: Notebooks, as you have seen, are environments to put documents, code, graphs, etc. in one place. They make it easier to repeat science, specially the data analysis part. A really good tool for scientific reports, also other data-related analytical reports.
Mathematica, which is chosen for this course, is a proprietary (aka non-free) software. I wrote a blog post to explain the general problems with non-free software. There are other arguments why non-free software must not be involved specifically with scientific research and education. Anyway, world is not specifically an ideal place. So long story short, for now we need Mathematica access. For that, you can use either one of these three options,

Nevertheless, using Mathematica will help you learn coding in general and understand its concepts. So try not to get fixated on the syntax but how to read help (aka documentation), how to code, and how to debug. These are the same tasks you will do with any programming language.

Extra: I am planning to transfer all the lab notebooks to Jupyter notebook environment, using either SciPy tools (Python), SageMath (based on Python), or Julia, and publish them somewhere under CC BY-SA. For this I need volunteers among you to try the notebooks and also do some little surveys.
My suggestions for scientific free software are SageMath (aka Sage), Python, and Julia. Also check my list of free software if interested. The Jupyter notebook supports more than forty programming languages. You can use it to produce your reports. If you need help to start with any of these tools or wanna volunteer to help me come talk to me.


Physics 275 Fall 2016

This is a lab course which meets at 3:20-6:20pm on Mondays at room 106 in Serin building. My office hours will be on Wednesdays and at the same room 106 in Serin building. Please read the 'Course Policy' on the home page of your Sakai. Please also read below.

Office Hours: My office hours will be held in the room 106, i.e. the lab room, Wednesdays 1-2pm. You can use the computers for Mathematica. I strongly discourage you to purchase a license. You can use computer rooms and libraries if the office hours are not enough to finish the work. You can also go to other intructors' office hours.

Lab Prerequisites: You need to submit the lab's prerequisite (aka pre-lab) correctly before the lab. You can not start participating in the lab before handing in a correctly done pre-lab. So I strongly advise you to submit the lab's prerequisite few days before the lab, so I can send you comments and you can correct them on time.
If you do not have access to Mathematica, the lab prerequisites can be printed (pdf file) and done by hand. You can email me a photo or a scanned version.
Avoid doing the pre-lab during the lab session. If needed, you can do prerequisites during office hours.

Labs: I encourage you to finish the labs and submit during the session. Try to get the notebook or pdf files for the labs and go through them before the labs. I will put pdf files for reading, in case you do not have access to Mathematica to open the nb files.
Labs are due to about four days from the day you take the data (day of the lab). So I set Friday 11pm as our deadline. If you submit later, for each day you will lose 5% of the total credit for that lab.
Missing two labs or more means failing the course. Missing one lab will also bring down your grade substantially.
If you cannot make it to our session, try to make up the lab in any other session the same week. Send me and the other TA an email for the heads-up.

Error Analysis: The error analysis, which lab 1 covers its basics, will be used in other labs in this course and also any computational/experimental science you do later in life. Finish all the readings suggested in the lab 1. Let me copy the list here,
Books:
- P. R. Bevington, "Data Reduction and Error Analysis for the Physical Sciences", McGrawHill. Chapter 1 and 2.3,
- John R. Taylor, "An Introduction to Data analysis", University Science Books. Chapters 1 to 5.
You can find a copy of the above chapters inside your Sakai, Resources/Books folder.
It is also recommended to read this tutorial.
Doing this reading, you will save lots of time and hassle later on, when calculating or understanding errors.

Later, I will post the converted notebooks, i.e. using Jupyter notebooks with either SageMath or Python3 kernels. I will appreciate any feedbacks. The reason I am doing this is related to this post I wrote, and this article.


Physics 230 Summer 2016

This is a lab course which meets Mondays and Wednesdays at either one of the lab rooms 225 or 232 in Serin building. Please read the 'Course Policy' in the 'Resources' folder of your Sakai page for more info on grade scheme, quizzes, et cetera. Here on this page, I will post comments, quizzes with solutions, and maybe some sample lab reports.

If you need further assistance with uncertainties either one of these books (maybe only first chapter of either) would suffice,
+ "An Introduction to Error Analysis" by John R. Taylor,
+ "A practical guide to data analysis for physical science students" by Louis Lyons.
Or come talk to me.
As I quickly reviewed at the beginning of lab 1, there are few mistakes in the ExperimentalUncertainty.pdf file provided in Sakai. Specifically ignore the section "Comparable uncertainties and additional details" and the solutions for exercises 5 and 6. I will erase this remark after these mistakes gets fixed on the note.

The pre-labs are due to the beginning of the corresponding lab. The pre-labs make 30% of your lab grade, almost as much as your lab reports. You can give me the pre-lab in any format. If you prefer non-print format, please do not print, just send me the text, tex, html, pdf, or LibreOffice format document file.

The lab reports (make 35% of your lab grade) must be handed in (paper, copied to my usb stick, or emailed to me) by the end of each lab session. I encourage you to type your reports instead of hand-writing. Use either LibreOffice formats, pdf, tex, text, or html. You can hand-in the figures, diagrams, tables, et cetera separately on paper, if you are not quick with digital drawing or tables.

If you are interested to boost your LaTeX, I encourage you to typeset your lab reports or pre-labs with it. Even if you are a beginner or interested to learn, I encourage you to pick up LaTeX. This is a good opportunity to brush up your skills and speed in typesetting, which you will need much more later on. I will do my best to help you start or speed up.

  • Lab 1. Reflection & Refraction.
    + A dictionary for common mistakes, pre-lab #1 [.txt], lab #1 [.txt].
    + A sample lab report [.pdf]. At least check the last page of this sample lab report for some general comments.
    + If you haven't already, finish and hand in the pre-lab before starting the second lab.
  • Lab 2. Geometric Optics.
    + A dictionary for common mistakes, pre-lab #2 [.txt], lab #2 [.txt].
  • Lab 3. Light Wave Interference.
    + A dictionary for common mistakes, pre-lab #3 [.txt], lab #3 [.txt].
  • Lab 4. Light Wave Scattering.
    + Check this link for the pre-lab 4, question 1. Use other sources if needed.
    + A dictionary for common mistakes, lab #4 [.txt, .pdf].
  • Lab 5. Photoelectric Effect, Part I.
    + A dictionary for common mistakes, pre-lab #5 [.txt], lab #5 [.txt].
  • Lab 6. Photoelectric Effect, Part II.
    + A dictionary for common mistakes, pre-lab #6 [.txt], lab #6 [.txt].
  • Lab 7. Atomic Physics.
    + A dictionary for common mistakes, pre-lab #7 [.txt], lab #7 [.txt].
  • Lab 8. Quantum Dots.
    + A dictionary for common mistakes, pre-lab #8 [.txt], lab #8 [.txt].
  • Lab 9. Radioactivity.
    pre-lab #9 [.png].
    + A dictionary for common mistakes, pre-lab #9 [.txt], lab #9 [.txt].
  • Lab 10. Radiation Shielding.
    pre-lab #10 [.png].
    + A dictionary for common mistakes, pre-lab #10 [.txt], lab #10 [.txt].

Physics 206 Spring 2016

This is a lab course. See the home page for more information. Please read these pages, General Info and Make-up Labs. Before the lab, try to read the manual, at least review the physics. On the manual, the physics is explained usually before the instruction part.

If you think the manual is not clear at any point, either in explaining the physics or instructions on how to do the experiment, please make yourself heard. Though remember that, in science education, being too clear is a thing. See this talk by Derek Muller.

Below you will find the quizzes with solutions, by the end of the week you took them. We will do the quizzes at the beginning of the lab sessions. There will be 6 semi-unannounced quizzes and 10 lab sessions.

  • Electrostatics I, II: quiz #1 [.pdf], solution [.pdf]
  • DC Circuits: quiz #2 [.pdf], solution [.pdf]
  • Magnetic Force, Faraday's Law: quiz #3 [.pdf], solution [.pdf]
  • RLC Circuits: quiz #4 [.pdf], solution [.pdf]
  • Geometric Optics: quiz #5 [.pdf], solution [.pdf]
  • Light Wave Interference, Atomic Spectra: quiz #6 [.pdf], solution [.pdf]

We will have the make up lab session on Wednesday, April 27th, 7pm-10pm, at room 228 Serin (aka physics building).


Physics 203 Summer 2015

Summer courses might feel pretty hasty, so try not to miss any classes. If you know the physics pretty well, you may show up for the last 20 minutes just to take the quiz. If the quizzes are too easy for you, come talk to me. Do not waste your time with doing things that are too easy for you, if you want to learn something new and enjoy it.

Please check this current page regularly for updates and solutions. Also see the homepage for more information about the course. Also you might find useful:
+ If you are interested to learn a subject with more rigor, I encourage you to use The Feynman Lectures on Physics.
+ There is an available course at Yale, similar to ours, R. Shankar's "Fundamentals of Physics I" course.
+ Another similar course, MIT 8.01, Physics I: Classical Mechanics by W. Lewin.

There is a forum environment (PHORUM) which you can use. You need an invitation to be able to register and ask questions. If you haven't gotten any invitation yet, ask me or your friends to invite you.

If you take clean notes during the recitations and want to share your notes with others, you can send me a scanned version of your notes. I will put it up here.

Tutorial Sessions


Physics 204 Spring 2015

I would appreciate if you adopt one of these habits: either show up on time, or show up 20 minutes before the end, for the quiz.

Check out our PHORUM page. I made a category "General Physics 204" category. Each session will have its own forum. So if you want to ask a question about a session or a subject you go to the corresponding forum and ask your question. This is the first time I have decided to use a forum system so we can get in touch outside the classroom. Please participate, otherwise this will look awkward.
You need to register to post a topic or reply to a topic. See the about page for more info.

Be active in our class and our forum and you will get a good grade on your quizzes. Each question you ask or answer during the class or in the forum counts.

I will post quizzes with their solutions here. We will try to cover similar problems to your homework. But sometimes a bit more challenging. I taught this course last year. The quizzes will be more or less similar.

The office hours will be on Wednesdays 3-4:30pm, at ARC 332.

See the homepage for more information about the course. You might find useful:
+ If you are interested to learn a subject with more rigor, I encourage you to use The Feynman Lectures on Physics.
+ There is an available course at Yale, similar to ours, R. Shankar's "Fundamentals of Physics II" course.
+ MIT 8.02, E&M by W. Lewin. The lectures include experimental demonstrations too, as some of you asked for. At least you can watch it in video.
+ PhysClips project started by Joe Wolfe. It has three volumes. Volumes II and III will have related material to our course. And there is a resource collection for E&M which is relevent to our course. Unfortunately, they have chosen Adobe Flash format.

Tutorial Sessions


Physics 271 Fall 2014

See the home page for more information. If you are interested to learn a subject with more rigor, I encourage you to use The Feynman Lectures on Physics.

I would appreciate if you adopt one of these habits: either show up on time, or show up 15 minutes before the end, for the quiz. I will post the problems which we will work on each session, few days before the class. You can take a look and decide when you want to show up.

My office hours are 9:30-11am on Fridays. I will be in the lab room Serin 106.

Here, as I said, you will find the list of problems which we will discuss in each session. That list will also give you ideas about the quiz. The quiz with solution will be posted after each session.

problem sets and quizzes

  • 1D Kinematics:
    problems#01 [.pdf], solutions#01 [.pdf], no quiz
  • 2D & 3D Kinematics:
    problems#02 [.pdf], solutions#02 [.pdf], quiz#02 [.pdf], quiz#02 solution [.pdf]
  • Force & Motion [I]:
    problems#03 [.pdf], solutions#03 [.pdf], quiz#03 [.pdf], quiz#03 solution [.pdf]
  • Force & Motion [II]:
    problems#04 [.pdf], solutions#04 [.pdf], quiz#04 [.pdf], quiz#04 solution [.pdf]
  • Kinetic Energy & Work:
    problems#05 [.pdf], solutions#05 [.pdf], quiz#05 [.pdf], quiz#05 solution [.pdf]
  • Potential Energy & Energy Conservation:
    problems#06 [.pdf], solutions#06 [.pdf], quiz#06 [.pdf], quiz#06 solution [.pdf]
  • Linear Momentum:
    problems#07 [.pdf], solutions#07 [.pdf], quiz#07 [.pdf], quiz#07 solution [.pdf]
  • Rotation:
    problems#08 [.pdf], solutions#08 [.pdf], quiz#08 [.pdf], quiz#08 solution [.pdf]
  • Rolling, Torque, & Angular Momentum:
    problems#09 [.pdf], solutions#09 [.pdf], quiz#09 [.pdf], quiz#09 solution [.pdf]
  • Equilibrium & Elasticity:
    problems#10 [.pdf], solutions#10 [.pdf], quiz#10 [.pdf], quiz#10 solution [.pdf]
  • Oscillations:
    problems#11 [.pdf], solutions#11 [.pdf, .webm, .youtube], quiz#11 [.pdf], quiz#11 solution [.pdf]
  • Gravitation:
    problems#12 [.pdf], solutions#12 [.pdf], no quiz
  • Heat, Temperature, & The 1st Law of Thermodynamics:
    problems#13 [.pdf], solutions#13 [.pdf], quiz#13 [.pdf], quiz#13 solution [.pdf]
Videos made by Jonah Williams (CC BY-SA)
JW1 [.webm], JW2 [.webm], JW3 [.webm], JW4 [.webm], JW5 [.webm], JW6 [.webm], (also available in his youtube channel).

Questions/Answers:
Q1) I cannot make it to your office hours. Can we arrange another time?
A1) Untill furthur notice, no. But you can attend others' office hours if they are okay with it.
Q2) I am not doing well on your quizzes. How can I improve my grades?
A2) Solve textbook exercises and problems regularly and work your way up toward more elaborate problems. Try out the problems we have on this page. For extra points, you can make videos for the problems, using screencasting, a classroom board, a wall using dry erase roll or blackboard roll, slides, et cetera. Check this blog post. For each problem make a video with 1 minute < length < 10 minutes. We can publish your work here if you agree. It will help your physics, oral skills, grade, your friends, and the community. Please consider the public domain or CC licenses for your work.
Q3) I am interested in making videos. Where should I start?
A3) Step 0. You are interested. Step 1. You pick a somehow elaborate problem to solve. You can use our quizzes, problem sets, problems from any textbook, or come up with one. If you are using a textbook problem, try to rephrase it, or quote and cite. Write down the solution in multiple steps, like a storyboard, and show it to me. We make sure your solution is correct. I give you my comments and will tell you how many points you will make up towards the related quiz[zes], if you make the video. Step 2. If you decide to do it, you go ahead and make the video. Send me the raw version. Again, I give you my comments. You edit it. Step 3. Finally you choose a copyright license (for example CC BY-SA) and I help you to publish it.
Q4) What format shall I use for video[s]?
A4) Use either Ogg, Metroska, or WebM containers, with a set of free (libre in Spanish) codecs. The free codecs that I know of, are this list, VP8, and VP9. VP8 or VP9 are video codecs that WebM uses.

Physics 275 Fall 2014

This is a lab course. See the home page for more information. Contact Girsh Blumberg if you have any problem accessing the web page. Unfortunate for the people other than the students of this course, the course is hosted on a locked system. Again, contact Girsh if you want to access the syllabus, files, et cetera.

My office hours are 9:30-11am on Fridays. I will be in the lab room, Serin 106. You can come by to finish your lab report or to do the prerequisite for next week's lab. Or come by and let's talk about physics.

Unfortunately, seems like you are doing all the work on Mathematica, which is a non-free (aka proprietary) software. Try not to waste your money on a new license of this program. Use the lab's computers, computer lab in ARC, or LSM library (2nd floor). Girsh said we might be able to give some of you permissions to get in the lab using your student card. Willow, an other TA for this lab, came up with a nice idea which I will adopt: Having office hours at the lab. See previous paragraph.

The prerequisites must be submitted 24 hours before the lab. It is okay if you submit it the night before the lab. If you submit later than the night before the lab, you will loose one point from the lab report. And your lab report will not be considered as submitted until all lab partners submit their prerequisite work.

Grades: In case you are fairly close to a higher grade, you can do one of these assignments to boost your grade. The deadline is 12pm (noon) Wednesday Dec 17.
275EA1) Choose two or three labs, wherein you did figure out systematic error and random error, and you did some error calculations. Write down, neatly, examples from these labs, for someone who has no idea about how to do errors. Try to inclde at least one example explaining systematic error, one for random error, and include at least three error calculations.
275EA2) Again take data from a lab you did and do all the fittings (at least two linear or one non-linear) using the method of least-squares fitting.
Notes: Both of these assignments would be about one page document. You can make it a notebook file. I encourage you to use IPython, IJulia, or Sage (SageMathCloud is an environment which you can do much more than math and writing). See IPython notebook examples for inspiration. I also encourage you to share your notebook file with others using a CC BY-SA license. I suggest you team up with one or two other classmates. Doing this assignment will help you to boost your grade, review error analysis or least-squares fitting, maybe to learn one free (as in freedom) and useful program, and maybe to teach others about errors or fitting.
I will accept document format (LibreOffice or LaTeX, send me the pdf file), notebook file (IPython notebook, IJulia notebook, Sage, or unhappily I will accept Mathematica), or video format (.webm, .ogv, .mkv, using free codecs, see A4 above on this page). I emphasize that you must assume the reader or viewer does not know anything about the errors or least-squares fitting. So you need to explain the steps clearly. If you are using a formula, prove it explicitly, or sketch the proof, or explain where it comes from.


Physics 229 Summer 2014

This is a lab course. See the home page for more information. Try to get prepared by studying the manual before attending the lab. Below you can find the past quizzes with solutions. You can see your grades in this spreadsheet file.

quizzes & problem sets


Physics 124 Spring 2014

Students, if you want you can help me making videos for solutions. You can either choose a problem we covered or a problem that has not been covered in our sessions. You will get up to +5 for each subject that you make an explanatory video for. You can ask for my help either in technical matters or physics. These points will be added directly to your quiz grade which has the same subject. I will upload your videos here under your name and the CC license. If you do not agree with the CC license terms we can discuss it. This is a good opportunity to improve your physics, your oral skills, and your grade.
Office hour is on Thursdays 5-6pm, Serin 289. Please email me through the week if you are attending. There is a small issue. Doors are locked after 4:30pm, so you have to come to the Serin's south door by the PLH and contact me. I will come down open the door for you.

tutorial sessions,

tut#01) dynamics of rotational motion
  • problem set #1 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
  • problem set #2 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
tut#02) equilibrium and elasticity
tut#03) fluid mechanics
  • problem set #1 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
  • problem set #2 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
tut#04) gravitation
  • problem set #1 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
  • problem set #2 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
sample exam
  • problems & solutions [.link]
tut#05) simple harmonic motion
  • problem set #1 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
  • problem set #2 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
tut#06) mechanical waves
  • problem set #1 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
  • problem set #2 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
tut#07) sound waves
  • problem set #1 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
  • problem set #2 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
tut#08) beats & interference
  • problem set #1 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
  • problem set #2 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
sample exam
  • problems & solutions [.link]
tut#09) waves (review session)
  • problem set #1 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
  • problem set #2 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
tut#10) temperature & heat
  • problem set #1 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
  • problem set #2 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
tut#11) thermal properties of matter
  • problem set #1 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
  • problem set #2 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
tut#12) the 1st law of thermodynamics
  • problem set #1 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
  • problem set #2 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
tut#13) the 2nd law of thermodynamics
  • problem set #1 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
  • problem set #2 [.pdf], solution [.pdf, .webm, .youtube]
sample exam
  • problems & solutions [.link]


Physics 204 Spring 2014

quizzes

  • quiz #1 [.pdf], solution [.pdf]
  • quiz #2 [.pdf], solution [.pdf]
  • quiz #3 [.pdf], solution [.pdf]
  • quiz #4 [.pdf], solution [.pdf]
  • quiz #5 [.pdf], solution [.pdf]
  • quiz #6 [.pdf], solution [.pdf]
  • tutorial #7, electromagnetic waves (no quiz)
  • quiz #7 [.pdf], solution [.pdf]
  • quiz #8 [.pdf], solution [.pdf]
  • quiz #9 [.pdf], solution [.pdf]
  • quiz #10 [.pdf], solution [.pdf]
  • quiz #11 [.pdf], solution [.pdf]
  • tutorial #13, the nature of the atom (no quiz)
  • quiz #12 [.pdf], solution [.pdf]